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History of the Rebel Stout

03-06-2013


The History of the Rebel Stout

 

Murphy’s Stout, a.k.a. the rebel stout, has a long past tied to its homeland Cork, Ireland.

 

The story begins in 1709, when the Murphy family first moved to Cork Ireland. There they settled in and became pillars of the community. Finally, in 1856, James, the eldest out of fifteen children, started brewing the classic Irish beverage out of his new brewery, Murphy’s. The brewery wasn’t just welcomed by local Cork dwellers but went nationwide and by 1861 it established itself as a major Irish brewery.

 

In fact, Murphy’s Brewery became such a symbol of Irish pride, it was the choice of drinker by the fighters during the Irish War of Independence.  Cork Ireland was known as a hot spot for these rebel fighters during the war and once again during the Irish Civil War. With a hometown like Cork, which became known as the rebel county, Murphy’s stout soon gained the nickname rebel stout.

 

For Murphy’s, wartime signified a period of change for the brewery. In 1914 a vat of porter flooded the brewery and even a bit of the town. By 1921 they recovered enough from the flood to start bottling beer. Steadily, Murphy’s Brewery grew until it finally came to the U.S. in 1979, satisfying the thirsts of Irish and non-Irish alike.

 

Although St. Patrick’s Day is full of merry faces, green oddities and lots of drinking, it is also a time for tradition. For Irish and those who are Irish for a day, celebrate with a true Irish drink and enjoy Ireland’s only rebel stout.

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